Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication, Module 5

Module 5: Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions, Module 4

Module 4: Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness, Module 3

Module 3: Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience?, Module 2

Module 2: Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative, Module 1

Module 1: Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Segmentation d’audience : application à la nutrition

Les stratégies de changement social et comportemental (CSC) sont essentielles pour enlever les obstacles sociaux et structurels et encourager des comportements positifs en matière de nutrition. Les CSC peuvent favoriser une utilisation accrue des services de santé, de meilleures interactions entre le client et le fournisseur, et une plus grande diversité alimentaire, entre autres résultats.

Pour améliorer l’efficacité des stratégies de CSC, les planificateurs de programmes doivent comprendre le(s) public(s) visé(s) et les facteurs qui déterminent leur comportement. La segmentation du public est une technique qui permet de diviser une population en groupes présentant des caractéristiques similaires liées à un sujet ou à un comportement d’intérêt, ce qui permet de mieux comprendre les facteurs démographiques, les normes et les attitudes qui permettent ou empêchent un changement de comportement positif au sein de chaque groupe. L’utilisation de la segmentation de l’audience peut aider les praticiens du CSC à développer des interventions adaptées aux caractéristiques et aux besoins particuliers de chaque groupe.

Ce cours est destiné aux professionnels du CSC et de la prestation de services qui cherchent à encourager un changement positif des comportements nutritionnels en utilisant la segmentation basée sur les besoins, les attitudes et les comportements du ou des publics visés.

USAID et Breakthrough ACTION logos

Changement social et de comportement pour la prestation de services de santé sexuelle et reproductive

Appliquer des approches et techniques de changement social et de comportement (CSC) aux efforts de prestation de services peut motiver les clients à accéder aux services, améliorer les interactions entre les clients et les prestataires et favoriser l’adoption et le maintien de comportements sains. Cette approache peut améliorer les résultats en matière de santé en aidant les prestataires à améliorer la qualité de l’engagement et du dialogue au sein de communauté, l’éducation des clients et la promotion de la santé, ainsi que le counseling [ou conseil] et la prise de décision partagée. Les approches de CSC peuvent améliorer l’expérience globale des clients en matière de soins, ce qui peut se traduire par une plus grande satisfaction de la prestation des soins de santé, une confiance accrue envers les prestataires de soins de santé et le système de santé, et une amélioration des comportements qui favorisent la recherche des soins et le maintien de la santé.

L’objectif principal de ce cours est de démontrer comment le CSC peut être intégré aux services de santé sexuelle et reproductive (SSR) afin d’améliorer l’acceptabilité, l’accès, la qualité et les résultats. En outre, il vise à renforcer la capacité des partenaires de prestation de services à intégrer le CSC à leur travail et identifier de façon succincte comment et où le CSC peut être utilisé à chaque étape du continuum de services, c’est-à-dire avant, pendant et après la prestation de services.

Public cible

Ce cours s’adresse au personnel du secteur public qui supervise la prestation de services de SSR aux niveaux national et sous-national tels que les coordinateurs de SSR ; aux organisations non gouvernementales et communautaires axées sur la prestation de services ; et aux partenaires de prestation de services du secteur privé tels que les franchisés.

Le cours est ouvert à tous, mais surtout aux personnes ayant des connaissances limitées en matière de CSC. Il peut s’appliquer à d’autres domaines de la santé mais se concentre sur la prestation de services de SSR.

Conception du cours

Le cours se compose de quatre modules présentés ci-dessous que vous devriez pouvoir suivre en trois heures environ.

Audience Segmentation for Nutrition

Social and behavior change (SBC) strategies are critical for addressing social and structural barriers, and encouraging positive behaviors around nutrition. SBC can foster increased utilization of health services, improved client-provider interactions, and improved dietary diversity, among other outcomes.

To increase the effectiveness of SBC strategies, program planners must understand the intended audience(s) and the factors driving their behavior. Audience segmentation is a technique that divides a population into groups with similar characteristics related to a topic or behavior of interest, enabling a deeper understanding of the demographic factors, norms, and attitudes that enable or inhibit positive behavior change among each group. The use of audience segmentation can help SBC practitioners develop interventions tailored to each group’s particular characteristics and needs.

This course is intended for use by SBC and service delivery professionals seeking to encourage positive nutrition behavior change by employing segmentation based on needs, attitudes, and behaviors of intended audience(s).

Mettre en pratique la conception centrée sur l’humain pour l’amélioration des programmes de nutrition

La conception centrée sur l’humain est un mode de pensée qui place les personnes desservies par les programmes et les parties prenantes clés au centre du processus de conception et de mise en œuvre. Ce processus met l’accent sur la recherche, l’idéation, l’itération et la création de prototype dans le but de trouver des solutions novatrices aux problèmes complexes.  Même s’il existe divers processus de CCH, ils reposent tous principalement sur l’empathie : une bonne compréhension de tous les besoins des parties prenantes impliquées dans le défi à relever.

L’objectif de ce cours vise à soutenir les programmes de changement social et comportemental grâce à la présentation de la CCH et de son utilisation pour relever les défis liés aux comportements en matière de nutrition.  La compréhension des étapes clés et des méthodes appliquées à chaque étape permettra aux apprenants de mieux comprendre la valeur ajoutée de la CCH sur leur travail et d’accéder à un ensemble d’outils pratiques qui peuvent être immédiatement mis en œuvre pour développer, soutenir et améliorer les programmes de nutrition.

USAID et Breakthrough ACTION logos

Building Trust and Empathy Around COVID-19: A Client-Centered Communication Approach

The role of a health care worker (HCW) is pivotal for quality health care delivery, demanding both competence and empathy. Despite being recognized as a trusted source for COVID-19 vaccine-related information, HCWs were infrequently engaging and counseling their clients about COVID-19 testing and vaccine uptake. Moreover, in-depth interviews conducted by Breakthrough ACTION with HCWs in four states of Nigeria–Akwa-Ibom, Bauchi, Enugu, Lagos–reported that they lack sufficient information on COVID-19 and COVID-19 vaccines and require more information on COVID-19 and vaccination (Breakthrough ACTION, 2022). Recognizing the critical role HCWs play in vaccination decisions, there was a need to enhance their knowledge, attitudes, and communication skills.

In response to these challenges, Breakthrough ACTION initiated a comprehensive, multi-component intervention, “Building Trust and Empathy Around COVID-19: A Client-Centered Communication Approach.” This intervention aimed to enhance HCWs’ knowledge of and attitudes about COVID-19 and vaccines, improve communication skills and, in turn, client-provider interactions, and foster resilience to the stress induced by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Building Trust and Empathy curriculum supplements the Nigeria Federal Ministry of Health’s National Interpersonal Communication and Counseling manual to equip health workers with tools to address vaccine hesitancy and promote COVID-19 prevention, testing, and vaccination as per national guidelines. This two- to three-hour long online course is adapted from a two-day in-person training.  

Learners should also explore the Nigeria country page of the COVID-19 Communication Network for additional supplemental materials that were developed to reinforce this training, which includes the participant’s training bookletawareness cards (also available in Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba), posters, and learning videos.