Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication, Module 5

Module 5: Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions, Module 4

Module 4: Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness, Module 3

Module 3: Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience?, Module 2

Module 2: Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative, Module 1

Module 1: Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria.

About the Series

This learning series, Evidence-Based Malaria Social and Behavior Change Communication: From Theory to Program Evaluation, provides an overview on how to use data to make social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions more robust, with a focus on malaria. This includes strategies to encourage the long-term adoption of behaviors related to malaria, such as sleeping under a net and seeking care for fever for various target audiences: pregnant women, providers, and children under five, for example.  

If you are interested in how to make your malaria prevention SBCC program more robust or improve your ability to measure the outcomes of your program, then take the whole learning series, which consists of five modules. Each module is treated as a separate course with its own final evaluation and certificate of completion.

Modules

  1. Telling Stories About Behavior: Theory As Narrative is presented by Doug Storey and will introduce participants to some of the basic theories used in SBCC, using examples specific to malaria. 
  2. Formative Research for SBCC: Do You Know Your Audience? is presented by Michelle R. Kaufman and will introduce participants to the basics of formative research for informing SBCC programs, using examples specific to malaria.
  3. Pretesting: A Critical Step to Ensuring SBCC Effectiveness is presented by Rupali Limaye and will introduce participants to the critical steps in pretesting SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria. 
  4. Monitoring Malaria SBCC Interventions is presented by Hannah Koenker and will introduce participants to various approaches and indicators for monitoring malaria SBCC activities. 
  5. Evaluating Social and Behavior Change Communication is presented by Marc Boulay and will introduce participants to techniques for evaluating and attributing causality to SBCC interventions, using examples specific to malaria.
PMI/USAID/Breakthrough ACTION logos

Suivi des rumeurs et gestion de l’infodémie dans les situations d’urgence en santé publique

La surabondance d’informations sur la santé – y compris les rumeurs et la désinformation en ligne et hors ligne – est un problème croissant dans le monde entier. Cette situation, appelée infodémie, oblige les responsables de la santé publique et les professionnels de la santé à redoubler d’efforts pour fournir au public des informations exactes et actualisées.

Ce cours s’adresse aux responsables de la mise en œuvre des programmes de communication des risques et d’engagement communautaire, ainsi qu’à d’autres professionnels du monde entier qui s’efforcent d’identifier les rumeurs émergentes et d’y répondre. Le cours offre une vue d’ensemble de la théorie et de la pratique de la création d’un système de gestion de l’infodémie, y compris des instructions étape par étape, des études de cas et des liens vers des outils supplémentaires. Les participants apprendront les définitions clés, étudieront la manière de mener une analyse paysagère de l’infodémie et sélectionneront des sources de données sur les rumeurs. Les modules couvrent également une variété de techniques d’analyse, des stratégies pour lutter contre la désinformation et des considérations pour le suivi et l’évaluation de la gestion des infodémies.

USAID et Breakthrough ACTION logos

Rumor Tracking and Infodemic Management in Public Health Emergencies

The overabundance of health information—including rumors and misinformation on and offline—has been a growing challenge across the world. This situation, called an infodemic, requires public health officials and health providers to work even harder to provide the public with accurate, up-to-date information.

This course is intended for risk communication and community engagement program implementers and other professionals working to identify and respond to emerging rumors. It offers an overview of the theory and practice of creating an infodemic management system, including step-by-step instructions, case studies, and links to additional tools. Participants will learn key definitions, consider how to conduct an infodemic landscaping analysis, and select sources of rumor data. The course modules also cover a variety of analysis techniques, strategies for addressing misinformation, and considerations for monitoring and evaluating infodemic management efforts.

CCSC contre le paludisme fondée sur les preuves : de la théorie à l’évaluation du programme

L’objectif de cette série d’eLearning est de fournir une vue d’ensemble sur la manière d’utiliser les données pour rendre les interventions CCSC plus robustes, en mettant l’accent sur le paludisme. Cela inclut des stratégies visant à encourager l’adoption à long terme de comportements liés au paludisme, tels que dormir sous une moustiquaire et rechercher des soins en cas de fièvre pour différents publics cibles : les femmes enceintes, les prestataires et les enfants de moins de 5 ans, par exemple.

Si vous souhaitez savoir comment rendre votre programme CCSC en matière de prévention du paludisme plus solide ou améliorer votre capacité à mesurer les résultats de votre programme, suivez ce cours composé de 5 modules.

Module 1 : Raconter les comportements : la théorie comme approche narrative est présenté par le Dr Doug Storey et offrira aux participants une introduction sur les théories de base utilisées dans la communication pour le changement de comportement et de norme sociale, en utilisant des exemples spécifiques au paludisme.

Module 2 : Recherche formative pour la CCSC: connaissez-vous votre public ? est présenté par le Dr Michelle R. Kaufman et offrira aux participants une introduction sur les bases de la recherche formative pour les programmes d’information de la CCSC, en utilisant des exemples spécifiques au paludisme. 

Module 3 : Le pré-test : une étape cruciale pour garantir l’efficacité de la CCSC sera présenté par le Dr Rupali Limaye et offrira aux participants une introduction sur les étapes cruciales des interventions de pré-test de la CCSC, en utilisant des exemples spécifiques au paludisme.

Module 4 : Suivi des interventions CCSC sur le paludisme est présente par le Dr Hannah Koenker et offrira aux participants une introduction à plusieurs approches et indicateurs pour suivre les activités de CCSC relatives au paludisme.

Module 5 : Évaluation de la communication pour le changement social et comportemental est présenté par le Dr Marc Boulay et offrira aux participants une introduction sur les techniques d’évaluation et d’attribution de la causalité des interventions de la CCSC, en utilisant des exemples spécifiques au paludisme.

Suivi des programmes de changement social et de comportement

La réussite des programmes de changement social et comportemental (SBC) repose sur un suivi attentif et constant. Le suivi est un processus continu qui vise à s’assurer qu’un programme de SBC est sur la bonne voie pour atteindre ses buts et objectifs. Lorsque les circonstances des programmes de SBC évoluent, comme c’est presque toujours le cas, le suivi peut permettre aux activités des programmes de s’adapter à la nouvelle situation et de déterminer dans quelle mesure elles y parviennent.

Ce cours concernant le suivi des programmes de SBC a pour but de fournir aux participants les bases nécessaires au suivi de tout type d’intervention programmatique. Il fait partie d’une série pédagogique complète qui comprend un ensemble de ressources destinées à aider les personnels des programmes à effectuer le suivi de leurs programmes de SBC en s’appuyant sur des outils éprouvés et des études de cas. Il permettra aux participants de concevoir leur stratégie de suivi.

Mesurer le changement de comportement du prestataire

Le comportement du prestataire définit une série d’actions qui incluent, sans s’y limiter, la gestion de l’établissement, l’adhésion aux protocoles cliniques, la supervision et l’interaction client-prestataire. De plus, ces comportements sont le résultat d’un ensemble complexe de facteurs, tant internes (par exemple, les attitudes, les valeurs et les croyances) qu’externes (par exemple, le soutien du superviseur, l’accès au développement professionnel et un environnement de travail favorable). Pour améliorer les services de santé, il est essentiel de comprendre ce qui motive les comportements des prestataires et comment ils influent sur les résultats obtenus par les clients. 

Le comportement des prestataires peut influencer considérablement les expériences des patients en matière de services de santé et leur probabilité d’adhérer au traitement ou aux recommandations. La façon dont un prestataire se comporte peut modifier la probabilité que les patients s’engagent à nouveau dans les services de santé pour améliorer leur état de santé. De plus en plus, les experts reconnaissent qu’une formation adéquate des agents de santé et un soutien structurel (par exemple, la disponibilité des produits, la confidentialité des salles de consultation) ne suffisent pas à fournir des services de santé de haute qualité. Les programmes de changement social et de comportement (CSC) ont introduit des stratégies visant à améliorer les performances des agents de santé. Cependant, la compréhension actuelle de la façon de mesurer le comportement des prestataires et le changement de comportement des prestataires (CCP) est limitée. 

Ce cours vise à soutenir les programmes de CSC en aidant les planificateurs et les concepteurs de programmes à mieux comprendre les initiatives de CCP et leur impact sur la prestation et la qualité des services. Le cours vise également à faire progresser la mesure du CCP en fournissant des cadres et des exemples illustratifs de la façon dont la mesure du CCP peut informer la planification et la conception du programme. Les utilisateurs participeront à deux courtes vidéos d’instruction qui durent entre 10 et 15 minutes. Les vidéos sont accompagnées d’un guide pratique que les étudiants peuvent imprimer pour s’y référer facilement. 

Breakthrough RESEARCH a développé ce cours pour les responsables de programmes et les professionnels de niveau intermédiaire qui souhaitent mieux comprendre le comportement des prestataires, les approches de CCP et la façon de mesurer les résultats de ces approches. Bien que les étapes présentées comprennent des exemples spécifiques aux programmes de planification familiale, les praticiens du CSC peuvent les appliquer à n’importe quel programme.